End of the 2017-18 school year

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Another school year in the books. As with each passing year, a lot happened in 2017-18. Bullet points seem appropriate.

  • First and foremost, my adventures with problem-based learning took up most of my mental real estate. That journey deserved its own post.
  • This was truly the year of the whiteboard. I had 12 of them wrapped around the edges of my classroom this year that we used every day. It was great.
  • I need to step my game when it comes to the cohesion and collective responsibility that my department shows for one another. Just like last year, I felt isolated this year. More than ever, this year I desperately needed support from colleagues that I didn’t receive. There are lots of reasons for this, but my own introverted nature certainly didn’t help matters any. Next year I hope I can be a better teammate and leader.
  • While PBL took off in room 227 this year, I’m very disappointed that my push to address racial inequities in my classroom stalled. I failed to build on many of the conversations that I started with my students last year. For example, my Mathematicians Beyond White Dudes initiative halted after Vivienne Malone-Mayes (No. 3). This was due primarily to my borderline obsession with implementing problem-based learning and all the struggles related to it. This issue is deeply personal and I’m very very dispirited that I let it trail off. Several of the kids even called me out on it near the end of the year. This only adds more fuel to the fire for next year. Specifically, with all this work on PBL and discussion-based learning, I’m now interested in exploring the intersection of those two strategies and the racially relevant pedagogy that I hope to espouse. I have a few books lined up this summer that I hope will help me think more about this.
  • I’ve begun toying with the idea of planning and organizing a ‘Math Night’ next year.  This is an exciting idea that I hope I can follow through with.
  • For the first time ever, I had my kids meaningfully write about the mathematics they were learning this year. It was a ‘metacognitve journal,’ a way of reflecting on their thinking about a particular problem that we solved. I only did one in late spring and it helped me realize that critical reflection like this journal must a component of my classroom moving forward, especially as I move to intentionally develop problem-solving skills in my students. I dramatically underestimated how long it would take me to grade them! Agh!
  • I checked no homework for credit this year. Sadly, this meant that the majority of kids didn’t do their homework. Am I ok with this? No. But I’m still not ok with checking it each day for points. #teacherproblems
  • This year I thought a lot about public and private school collaboration. I spent full days visiting both Phillips Exeter and Horace Mann schools. Both were worthwhile experiences. I hope to continue this work next year – especially with Horace Mann because of proximity.
  • In the spring, I was very close to having a parent observe my class. I was inspired by an NYCDOE survey that asked whether I’ve had any parent visit my class this year. Although it never happened, for the first time it made me seriously think about the inherent boundaries that exist between parents and the spaces in which their children learn. I may be opening a can with this one, but I would really like to have at least one parent in my room to observe instruction next year.
  • I got away from standards-based grading this year. As a result, I wasn’t able to help students identify and understand their strengths and weaknesses in any sort of accurate way. This should change next year.
  • Recently, a colleague of mine just spoke about getting kids to ask more questions in class and he mentioned the use of sentence starters. I’ve been exposed to them for years and never used them. I think they’re so inviting and accessible for students and can help elevate how they articulate themselves. I would love to try them next year.
  • I taught a math elective this year called ‘Explorations in Mathematics’ that started off strong but fizzled out after the first semester. Much of this had to do with programming.
  • One of the non-teaching highlights of the year was chaperoning a trip to Denmark in April. Along with 5 other teachers, guidance counselors, and administrators, we accompanied a wonderful group of 24 students on this unforgettable overseas adventure that included homestays with Danish families.
  • For the 2nd year in a row, I was nominated for a Big Apple Award. I don’t know why I was, but I am grateful and humble nonetheless.
  • I helped my school adopt the Math for America PLT model as part of our Monday PD cycle this year. This was a useful and engaging way to give teachers a direct say in the PD they experience. As far as I know, a first for school too.
  • I submitted the two remaining components of my National Board Certification. In December we’ll see what Pearson thinks of me.
  • Being the second year at my school, I found myself considerably less stressed about everyday happenings than last year. My sense of community grew.

 

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New year, new school, new me

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The next chapter of my career begins next week.

I’ll be teaching at a new school.

After a rewarding ten year tenure at my previous school, I made the decision to start anew. The move needed to happen for several reasons, both personal and professional. Moving on wasn’t something that hit me one day when I woke up. It was a slow, revealing process that took me over a year to fully accept. For anyone that’s been at a school for that long, you understand how bittersweet it can be to relocate. I left home.

First, the interview process.

I underestimated how much I would learn about myself. Over the course of four interviews and three demo lessons, I actually became a better teacher. I was presented with questions that I, being on several interview teams, was accustomed to asking candidates as opposed than being expected to answer myself. I was asked to respond to the question all math teachers face. I was asked to share the percentage of my lessons that I consider to have a low floor and high ceiling. I prompted about the nonnegotiable aspects of my classroom. I even experienced a progressive interview that consisted of pitching a course Shark Tank style, round robin meetings with several teachers, and a written reflection of the whole process. This really opened my eyes to what an interview can be.

All of the interviews put me in a position to think deeply about myself and my core values as a teacher. I do this regularly, but not in a way that forces me to formally present it to a stranger. In the moment, I discovered personal feelings and ideas about teaching that I wasn’t aware that I had. Who I am kidding, it was only my fourth job interview…ever.

I was fairly picky about my new school. Jokingly, a member of the interview team at my new school mentioned that it seemed like I was interviewing them. Well, I knew what I wanted. I knew that once I was in, I was in for the long term. I understood the level of commitment that I was making to myself and my new school – and I didn’t take that lightly. I wanted to be sure that my new home was the best place for my abilities and future contributions.

I wore so many different hats at my previous school (it was a small school by traditional standards). I created and maintained our GAFE suite and school website while supervising many after school activities including the intramural sports program, bicycle club, robotics team, tech team, among others. I was on several professional development committees and the LPP team. Not to mention the many other short-term commitments that came up that I volunteered to spearhead. All and all, I was considered a lead member of the staff, I played a central role.

Why do I bring all this up? What does it mean? It means that after securing my position in the spring, I’ve spent a considerable amount of time this summer pondering the rare opportunity that I now have. I’ve been coming to grips with the overwhelming idea of reestablishing myself as a teacher, teacher leader, stakeholder, and contributor. No one knows me. I don’t know most of the systems and structures to which I’ll be adapting. I don’t have seniority. No one cares about my history. I’m at zero. I’m just the new guy that teaches math.

And that is precisely why this dramatic change will elevate my career. I have the rare opportunity to rethink my practice from a rookie’s perspective. Surely there will be a period of adjustment. The transition has already proved to be challenging in many ways. But, at the same time, my classroom will be as fresh as it’s ever going to be. I can reevaluate my assumptions. The bonds I make with students, colleagues, and the overall school community will be rooted in how I build my new reputation. I’m painting on an blank canvas.

Looked at in a certain light, I’m a new teacher again…except that have 10 years of experience to guide me. This blank slate provides me with a unique advantage over my development – one that I hope allows me to contribute greatly to my new settings. I hope this perspective enables me to invigorate to my classroom and my school. Plus, talk about timing, because luckily I’m going to be chronicling the first year of my adventures at my new school for the day in the life of a teacher book project.

Here’s to writing the next chapter.

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Note: My new school referenced my blog. I am led to believe that it played a role in the hiring process.

End of the 2014-15 school year

Classroom Spring 2015

-1. Several weeks ago I began thinking about the end of the school year. I suddenly realized the startlingly amount of reflection that awaited me. Today is the last day of school and the only way for me to systematically get it all out is in a list. Here goes.

0. Leading up to this year, my school had a solid four-year stretch of low-turnover and highly stable school atmosphere. 2014-15 not only broke that streak…it was shattered and thrown it under a bus. Things were quite eventful.

1. With any change in leadership, one should expect adjustment in the day-to-day happenings. I found that I had grown too comfortable under previous leadership. Things and people change and I need to evolve with these changes so my productivity doesn’t stagger.

2. During and after vast transformations this year, my optimism was put to the test several times and, in some cases, folded. After scarring disappointments early on, it took a good amount of time to rededicate myself to the school’s mission. I let my frustration get the best of me at times – which I don’t regret. Live and learn.

3. What kept me going? What kept me from completely disconnecting from my school community?

4. The incredibly inspirational people around me. My students. My colleagues (in and out of my school). People I’ve never met. My family.

5. Teachers at my school are an awesome bunch. Despite the disarray abound, somehow they found a way to use their collective strength to keep us moving forward.

6. This was also my first school year blogging, which had a great deal to do with my naturally reflective nature this year. It framed my teaching like nothing I’ve ever experienced. I gained serious perspective by reflecting on my own practices via my blog.

7. I implemented standards-based grading. In terms of assessment, it’s one of the best moves I’ve ever made. I committed to it mid-year, which was tough, but it worked pretty much as planned. I had students assess their own retake exams, which was great, but I need to make a stronger push for retakes next year.

8. I helped plan weekly district-mandated professional development sessions for colleagues at my school. I found it both more engaging and challenging than I imagined before the year began. Professionally, this was an area of growth I didn’t expect. Thanks to MfA, I’ll be taking that a step further next year with my video club.

9. I absolutely struggled with four preps in the fall. The quality of my teaching was stretched thin and my students were shortchanged immensely.

10. I was entitled department chair in the spring. The math department had a tough year and we have a long journey ahead. I hope I am able to provide whatever leadership we need. That said, I passionately hate titles and the connotation that often comes along with them. They are hollow and irrelevant. I just want my work to be meaningful, collaborate, and help all of us reach another level.

11. Our robotics team made progress this year. We performed noticeably better than during the last two years of the program. Next year I hope to use class time (versus after-school) for competition preparation. This should afford the kids more time to build and tweak the robot. My robotics class expanded to include introductory arduinos along with the usual Lego Mindstorms.

12. My students did rather poorly on state exams. This is very disappointing given the amount of work both the students and myself have put in this year. So much so that I began questioning myself. How can I adjust to improve this result?

13. A woman leading a PD once told me “When my students don’t succeed, I look in the mirror and ask What could I have done differently?” This has stuck with me all year. It’s not about all the issues, setbacks, and lack of prerequisite skills that students bring into the classroom that hinders their learning. Instead, all that matters is what I do to meet their needs and get them to succeed. It’s a hard pill to swallow. But this perspective is key for me in my hopes of one day becoming a great teacher.

14. I could have been a better mentor. Despite many shortcomings, I have experience and insight that is conducive to the growth of colleagues new to this profession. I did a poor job this year mentoring a new teacher. She is wonderful and would never tell me so, but inside I know I could have had a much better impact on her.

15. I tried many new approaches this year to teach my kids. Just as importantly, I also implemented new ways to reach them. Whether it was friday letterspersonal notestwo stage exams, plickers, speed dating, problem-based learning, exit slips, or others, I can say that I have definitely made an effort to improve the happenings in my classroom.

16. Following up on a new year’s resolutionintervisitations played a significant role in my development this year. I discovered the need to not only get outside my classroom, but outside of my building, and explore the work of others. It helped motivate a colleague and me to apply for the 2015-16 NYCDOE Learning Partners program, which we were accepted. More to come!

17. I relearned how to be patient with my students. Big ups to my AP for pushing me to slow down the pace of the class and remind me to provide more scaffolding.

18. Goal for 2015-16: highly effective. Focus for 2015-16: to be better than I was in 2014-15.

20. Every school year seems to fly by when you’re at the end of it. This one was no different. It was a bumpy flight, but it was over before I knew it. Another one in the books.

Until June 2016.

 

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