End of the 2017-18 school year

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Another school year in the books. As with each passing year, a lot happened in 2017-18. Bullet points seem appropriate.

  • First and foremost, my adventures with problem-based learning took up most of my mental real estate. That journey deserved its own post.
  • This was truly the year of the whiteboard. I had 12 of them wrapped around the edges of my classroom this year that we used every day. It was great.
  • I need to step my game when it comes to the cohesion and collective responsibility that my department shows for one another. Just like last year, I felt isolated this year. More than ever, this year I desperately needed support from colleagues that I didn’t receive. There are lots of reasons for this, but my own introverted nature certainly didn’t help matters any. Next year I hope I can be a better teammate and leader.
  • While PBL took off in room 227 this year, I’m very disappointed that my push to address racial inequities in my classroom stalled. I failed to build on many of the conversations that I started with my students last year. For example, my Mathematicians Beyond White Dudes initiative halted after Vivienne Malone-Mayes (No. 3). This was due primarily to my borderline obsession with implementing problem-based learning and all the struggles related to it. This issue is deeply personal and I’m very very dispirited that I let it trail off. Several of the kids even called me out on it near the end of the year. This only adds more fuel to the fire for next year. Specifically, with all this work on PBL and discussion-based learning, I’m now interested in exploring the intersection of those two strategies and the racially relevant pedagogy that I hope to espouse. I have a few books lined up this summer that I hope will help me think more about this.
  • I’ve begun toying with the idea of planning and organizing a ‘Math Night’ next year.  This is an exciting idea that I hope I can follow through with.
  • For the first time ever, I had my kids meaningfully write about the mathematics they were learning this year. It was a ‘metacognitve journal,’ a way of reflecting on their thinking about a particular problem that we solved. I only did one in late spring and it helped me realize that critical reflection like this journal must a component of my classroom moving forward, especially as I move to intentionally develop problem-solving skills in my students. I dramatically underestimated how long it would take me to grade them! Agh!
  • I checked no homework for credit this year. Sadly, this meant that the majority of kids didn’t do their homework. Am I ok with this? No. But I’m still not ok with checking it each day for points. #teacherproblems
  • This year I thought a lot about public and private school collaboration. I spent full days visiting both Phillips Exeter and Horace Mann schools. Both were worthwhile experiences. I hope to continue this work next year – especially with Horace Mann because of proximity.
  • In the spring, I was very close to having a parent observe my class. I was inspired by an NYCDOE survey that asked whether I’ve had any parent visit my class this year. Although it never happened, for the first time it made me seriously think about the inherent boundaries that exist between parents and the spaces in which their children learn. I may be opening a can with this one, but I would really like to have at least one parent in my room to observe instruction next year.
  • I got away from standards-based grading this year. As a result, I wasn’t able to help students identify and understand their strengths and weaknesses in any sort of accurate way. This should change next year.
  • Recently, a colleague of mine just spoke about getting kids to ask more questions in class and he mentioned the use of sentence starters. I’ve been exposed to them for years and never used them. I think they’re so inviting and accessible for students and can help elevate how they articulate themselves. I would love to try them next year.
  • I taught a math elective this year called ‘Explorations in Mathematics’ that started off strong but fizzled out after the first semester. Much of this had to do with programming.
  • One of the non-teaching highlights of the year was chaperoning a trip to Denmark in April. Along with 5 other teachers, guidance counselors, and administrators, we accompanied a wonderful group of 24 students on this unforgettable overseas adventure that included homestays with Danish families.
  • For the 2nd year in a row, I was nominated for a Big Apple Award. I don’t know why I was, but I am grateful and humble nonetheless.
  • I helped my school adopt the Math for America PLT model as part of our Monday PD cycle this year. This was a useful and engaging way to give teachers a direct say in the PD they experience. As far as I know, a first for school too.
  • I submitted the two remaining components of my National Board Certification. In December we’ll see what Pearson thinks of me.
  • Being the second year at my school, I found myself considerably less stressed about everyday happenings than last year. My sense of community grew.

 

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4 Responses to End of the 2017-18 school year

  1. Wendy Menard says:

    Brian – what a year! I hate checking homework in class, and actually moved towards only using Deltamath for HW credit. If you are using an Exeter model, can you give HW credit for students putting problems on the board? Or does that interfere with the model somehow?

    You’d win my vote in the Big Apple award contest!

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    • brian says:

      Wendy! Yeah, I sort of tracked participation on the boards but never did anything with it. It was more to see who was getting most involved and to informally push kids to present their thinking on problems. At the close of each term I had each student give themselves a grade for their class participation, readiness, etc and that reflected this work, in a way. And Delta was AWESOME this year for me and my kids.

      Thanks Wendy!!

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  2. Mrs. R. says:

    Congrats on finishing your National Board Certification work! I am just getting started and it is a lot, so finishing is an accomplishment in itself.

    What are the books you’re reading over the summer, mentioned in your fourth bullet point about racially relevant pedagogy?

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    • brian says:

      Hey Mrs. R. Thanks for reading my long-winded post. Please let me know if you want to chat about NBCT. I had some serious help along the way and I would love to pay it forward!

      So right now I’m reading The Brillance of Black Children Doing Mathematics with plans to read Rehumanizing Mathematics for Black, Indigenous, and Latinx Students (NCTM) and Warriors Don’t Cry (Melba Pattillo Beals). More here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/15751397-brian?shelf=read

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