Day in the Life: Algebra 2 Regents Exam (Post #12)

I’ve decided to chronicle this school year through my blog. It’s part of Tina Cardone’s Day in the Life book project. This is the twelfth post in the series.

5:15am | Up and adam. I brew some coffee and head outside to sit and read for half an hour. The birds sing to me, which makes for a relaxing start to the day. Right now I’m in the middle of Why Don’t Kids Like School by Daniel T. Willingham. It’s pretty good.

I head back inside and put together some breakfast. I shower, grab the bike and make my way in.

7:15am | 13 minutes later I’m locking up my bike in the parking lot. This is still a little weird for me because for years I brought my bike up to my classroom.

On my way up to my classroom, I chat with a few teachers. Everyone is chill because we all know that today, June 16, 2017, is the fourth day of Regents exams. These are New York State high school exams. There is no more instruction for the year. New York City robustly organizes the grading of these exams in a pretty unique way, I think. Selected teachers from every high school in the city report to “grading sites” to mark the exams of students from schools other than their own. The organizational power that this requires is remarkable. For the most part, it runs pretty seamlessly every year. Unless you’re out scoring, you hang back at school to proctor the exams. If you’re not proctoring and have no other responsibilities, the time is yours to spend however you like. As for me, this morning I have to monitor a few seniors who are serving the remainder of their detention before commencement tomorrow, but other than that, there’s nothing that I have on tap.

What’s interesting about today is that my algebra 2 students are sitting for their Regents exam this afternoon. In total, there are about 75 students that will measure their understanding of algebra 2 against New York State’s ever-changing expectations. It’s a very anticlimactic end to their algebra 2 experiences.

7:30am | I make it up to my room, draft this post, and get lost in the abyss that is the internet. I’m hooked on brilliant.org, so of course I tackle a few their problems. I also continue working on my end-of-the-school-year draft that I began yesterday. The department chair comes in and tells me about this financial literacy course. Next year we will plan to have an alternative to Regents-bound algebra 2 and this course is one of the possibilities. It looks promising and it’s chock full of meaningful projects, which I like. We’ll see. Worst case, I incorporate certain features of the course and not others.

It’s crazy how two hours seemingly pass in the blink of an eye.

9:30am | I head down to the auditorium where there a bunch of seniors serving the last hours of their detention. While I fully expected it to be boring, I was pleasantly surprised at how enjoyable it was. It helped that I had several of the kids this year in class. We talked about future plans and they reflected on their past four years. One kid asked me about my feeling towards video games. I also made a bet with another about whether someone falls while walking on stage at commencement tomorrow. I said no, he said yes. The winner gets a Hershey’s.

Despite the fact that they were serving detention, the vibe I got was a communal one. Although I know it’s not true, it’s almost like they wanted to be there.

10:45am | On my way back to my classroom, I find a class set of tangrams in a closet. I’m thinking that I may use them next year in my discrete mathematics elective next year. I do a quick check-in with a girl doing makeup work to help her earn credit for the class. After, I go bunker down in my classroom and eat lunch.

Browsing Twitter, I read this tweet from Sara VanDerWerf. , I immediately place a hold on Blind Spot at the New York Public Library. Looks like a powerful read. It’s something I’ve been thinking a lot about over the last year.

11:45am | My classroom is being used for this afternoon tests, so I need to find another classroom to call my home for the next few hours. I do so and find that some of my students are hanging outside the building waiting to be let in for the exam. I head out there to greet them and remind them that they don’t need luck.

12:30pm | I pop into the various classrooms and give the kids a smile before they begin. No words, just a humble wave to accompany my grin. Other teachers this week have been bringing in candy and even bottles of water for the students. There’s something about this that doesn’t sit well with me. Maybe I’m overthinking things.

Anyhow, good feelings abound after my brief visit, but inside I can’t help but be disappointed that all of the work we’ve done this year has led to this moment. I leave them to work.

1:00pm | I walk up to the deli to grab a coffee. A colleague joins me. We talk about the upcoming “Field Day” that she’s planning for the last day of school. It’s an odd day because all of the grades are in and the exams are complete, but students technically still need to be here. She’s planning an entire at a local park full of all sorts of fun, outdoor activities.

1:15pm | I sit and continue my lazy day. I swear I’ve taken less than 1000 steps today.

I type up more of this post. I think about my students taking their exam. They’re great kids. I hope they’re doing well. I hope that their work is convincing to whoever grades their stuff. I could probably do something more productive with my time, but I decide to dive into more brilliant.org problems.

3:00pm | I decide that before I leave for the weekend that I should probably have a look at the algebra 2 exam, which all of my students are sweating through at this very moment. I get a copy from the test coordinator.

Look, historically speaking, my Regents results have never been something to call home about…and I know that there many other factors at play here. Nonetheless, despite it being a big part of my job description, I will openly admit that I’m not the greatest at preparing kids for these high-stakes exams. Last year, like 50 percent of my kids passed the algebra 2/trigonometry exam — and that was my highest percentage ever. So while I always hope and prepare for the best but, sadly, I don’t really have high expectations.

So back to today’s exam. As I comb through it, I’m shocked to realize how well my instruction aligned with the exam this year. My kids should do alright. But with my track record, I doubt it.

Let me stop. I’ll stay optimistic until the results starting coming in next week. (Secretly, I’m also banking on the ridiculously low passing score that NYS required.)

3:50pm | I leave school. It’s a nice Friday evening with the family. We go out for dinner.

9:20pm | Seemingly all I did today was solve brilliant.org problems, but somehow I’m tired. Go figure. Good night.

 

1. Teachers make a lot of decisions throughout the day. Sometimes we make so many it feels overwhelming. When you think about today, what is a decision/teacher move you made that you are proud of? What is one you are worried wasn’t ideal?

I made a conscious decision at detention this morning to help repair a relationship that turned sour this year. The student that I made the Hershey’s bet with…um, let’s just say we had a rough year. He hated disliked my class. He struggled and I failed to reach him. Yeah, it wasn’t a great experience for either one of us. But I was really glad we connected on something lighthearted and fun at detention today. I also promised myself to email him next week to follow up on a modeling opportunity that he told me about.

2. Every person’s life is full of highs and lows. Share with us some of what that is like for a teacher. What are you looking forward to? What has been a challenge for you lately?

As the year has come to a close, I’ve struggled with feeling rooted in my school. I hoped that by this time, I would feel some sort of genuine connection to my new home, but that hasn’t really happened.

3. We are reminded constantly of how relational teaching is. As teachers we work to build relationships with our coworkers and students. Describe a relational moment you had with someone recently.

Inspired by other bloggers, this week I invited a colleague to write a guest post for this here blog. What he produced was wonderful. He’s someone that has been talking about writing more for a long time…and I figured this might be a great opportunity for him. He not only seized the moment, but during the last couple of days, he’s been putting together his own website. His writing is taking off. He’s even thinking of writing a book this summer!

4. Teachers are always working on improving, and often have specific goals for things to work on throughout a year. What is a goal you have for the year?

In preparation for the Regents exam, I needed to structure my tutoring in a way that met the needs of all my students and at the same time didn’t drive me crazy. What I ended up going with was assigning each student a minimum number of hours of tutoring that they needed to complete before the exam. The number of hours they were assigned was based on their performance during the school year. They had a tracking sheet that I stamped. Of course, every student didn’t complete all of their hours, but for the most part, it was successful.

5. What else happened this month that you would like to share?

Here’s something that I’ve never done before: I taught one of my classes how to solve a Rubik’s Cube. I use the word “taught” loosely. I borrowed 12 cubes (it’s a small class) from You Can Solve the Cube I attempted to show them the steps that I use to solve it. Not all of them ended learning how to solve it, but I think they enjoyed the change of pace. Next year I’m going to leave more time so we can get into mosaics.

 

bp

Day in the Life: May 24, 2017 (Post #11)

I’ve decided to chronicle this school year through my blog. It’s part of Tina Cardone’s Day in the Life book project. This is the eleventh post in the series.

5:45am | I wake up. Boy, I’m tired. After staying up late to watch game 4 in Eastern Conference Finals between my hometown Cavs and Celtics, I certainly feel it. The early sunrise this morning helps pick up my mood.

I take an hour to eat, sip some coffee, draft this post, and shower. I’m on my way.

7:05am | I make it to school after a wet, soggy ride in. I make it up to my room and change into the clothes I keep in my closet for rainy days like today.

One of the Spanish teachers comes in to say hello and we chat. He’s no stranger, as we have periodically had some in-depth conversations about a variety of things this year. Today we talk at length about how our school years have gone and how they’re shaping up. We both have had disappointing moments and growing pains, but remain hopeful in the future. He’s a great guy. Our random talks have been a welcome respite his year.

I also spend a few minutes for an interview with a senior whose working on a project related to discrimination, racism, and stereotypes. Sharing my thoughts on camera with a student is a breath of fresh air. I don’t know her well, but I’m so happy that she’s dedicating time to researching these social issues. Our school needs it.

7:40am | Just like that, a half an hour passes. I throw on some music and begin mapping out the day for my students. Because the state tests are around the corner, we’re basically in Regents prep mode. At this time every year, I become a machine.

9:00am | First period comes to an end. The class is basically all seniors and today is prom. So yeah to say that they struggled to maintain focus is an understatement. I usually go to prom, but I’m sitting this one out. This is largely due to my lack of connection with the senior class…which is a consequence of this being my first year at my school. Next year.

I make it back to my room and remember that I need to run off a bunch of copies for my after-school Regents prep session after school today. I do that and come back to finish off plans for period 4 and 5.

10:35am | Fourth period begins. The focus is on solving a system of equations graphically. Specifically, we are using the graphing calculator to approximate the solutions to a given system of equations. I also give back their mock Regents that they took the previous Saturday. The results of which were promising. The lesson is ok, but nothing to call home about. The kids see a rational function for the first time and sort of freak out upon graphing it. Oops. We manage, but my poor pacing this year has caused all sorts of hiccups like this. I also manage to screw up one of the systems because the logarithm that I included in one of the functions doesn’t display properly on the graphing calculator because of a logarithm. This reminds me of Patrick Honner’s talk at MT^2 a few years back.

11:25am | Fifth period gets going. I head across the hall to the customary standing ovation. These kids are a blast. (Did I mention that I’ve started clapping for them when they walk out of the room?) The lesson is the exact same as period 4, but I make sure to develop the rational function a little better and skip the erroneous system.

12:15pm | I go heat up my lunch in the teacher’s lounge and run back to my room to scarf it down. I have some minor prep to do for period 8. While on my computer, I get a notice from UPS that my You Can Solve the Cube class set of Rubric’s Cubes arrived today. Excited, I pick them up from the main office. I recently learned how to solve a Rubric’s cube myself, so sharing this joy with my period 7 students (there’s no state test) is going to be great.

1:00pm | Speaking of period 7, they walk in. Because most are seniors, it’s a smaller group today (prom). I forewarn them that path to solving a Rubric’s Cube can get very frustrating. They nod, passively. I hand out the cubes and show them the first step in solving the cube. They practice this step over and over before the end of the period. They’re excited, I’m excited. It’s awesome.

1:50pm | My period 8 is officially starting “Regents Prep” today in class. A colleague made these fancy booklets containing all the Regents questions from like 2013 or something. We use those to review finding and using regression equations.

2:35pm | After school Regents prep starts for my algebra 2 students. I really like how I chose to set it up this year. Based on each student’s overall performance this year, I assigned them X amount of tutoring hours that they must get in before the Regents exam on June 16. They have a sheet to track all the hours that I stamp after every session they attend. It seems pretty efficient and holds every kid accountable.

4:35pm | The students staying for tutoring/Regents prep head home. I sit at my desk, reply to a few emails, and wait for the students completing their mock Regents to finish. At 5:05pm, I head home.

8:30pm | I’m still grading the mock Regents that the kids took, so I dedicate an hour to knocking out a good chunk of that.

9:50pm | Off to bed.

1. Teachers make a lot of decisions throughout the day. Sometimes we make so many it feels overwhelming. When you think about today, what is a decision/teacher move you made that you are proud of? What is one you are worried wasn’t ideal?

While bogged down by the Regents and essentially turning myself into a test-prep machine during the last week or two, I’m pumped about getting the Rubric’s Cubes for the kids. It’s different, fascinating, and fun. In fact, that may just keep me afloat until the last full day of instruction on June 13.

2. Every person’s life is full of highs and lows. Share with us some of what that is like for a teacher. What are you looking forward to? What has been a challenge for you lately?

Hmm. Why am I drawing a blank? Too many highs and lows to describe? I’ll rain check this one. TBD.

3. We are reminded constantly of how relational teaching is. As teachers we work to build relationships with our coworkers and students. Describe a relational moment you had with someone recently.

This month, I had a powerful moment this with a colleague about a t-shirt that she wore to school. To make a long story short, we connected on her decision to wear the shirt and, unfortunately, the disciplinary action that took place as a result. The entire situation was off-putting, but through it I learned so much about myself and my school about we address race and representation with colleagues and our students.

4. Teachers are always working on improving, and often have specific goals for things to work on throughout a year. What is a goal you have for the year?

While not one of my classroom-specific goals, this school year was to make a whole-hearted attempt at National Board component 2. All year, I’ve had this thing in the back of my mind, but it wasn’t until February when I began to seriously think about the specifics of what I was going to do. After losing about two weeks worth of sleep, I managed to submit it this month. The focus was my mini-unit on complex numbers. I’m pretty sire that it won’t be the best that NBCT will read, but I was super proud of all the thought that I put into it. I learned a lot, too. Next year: components 3 and 4.

5. What else happened this month that you would like to share?

On an unrelated-to-teaching note, this month I’ve decided that I will be taking piano lessons during the summer. It’s always been something that I’ve wanted to do since I was young, a “lifelong goal” of sorts. I’m thrilled!

bp

Day in the Life: April 24, 2017 (Post #10)

I’ve decided to chronicle this school year through my blog. It’s part of Tina Cardone’s Day in the Life book project. This is the tenth post in the series.

5:30am | Rise and shine. It’s later than I would have liked, but I didn’t sleep well last night. I throw lunch together, a simple salad. Waffles for breakfast. No time to read.

6:30am | I’m out the door. The ride to school is brisk. The sun is out earlier these days and it reminds me that the end of the school year is close.

6:45am | I lock up the bike and walk into school. I make it up to my room and spend 15 minutes drilling holes in the large, 4-ft-by-4-ft whitebaords that recently picked up from Home Depot. I have these super magnets that I’ll be using to hold up the boards on the lockers in my room. It’s cheezy, but I’m so proud of this solution.

7:35am | I walk my large whiteboards down to my first period classroom. It’s painless, but pretty annoying. They’re awkward to hold for long periods of time, like down the hallway. We’ll be using the whiteboards for some VNPS and VRG action today on factoring.

I make it back to my desk and finish up plans for first period. I print out a few articles for a student who walks in. At 8:10am, I make my way down to first period.

9:00am | First period comes to an end. For what it’s worth, I consider it a win. I’ve learned so much from that class. More below. Whew.

I walk all of my crap back down to my room an decide that I need coffee. I head out to the bodega at the corner. As always, black, no sugar.

9:15am | I’m back at my desk and sit to map out a couple of other lessons for the day. Specifically, I put together the group speed dating activity for period 5. It’s a review of factoring and the conic form of a parabola.

10:05am | I run down the hallway to use the bathroom and I see one of my 7th period students wondering about. I ask her what’s up and she says tat she doesn’t want to go to lunch because her friends aren’t here today. I invite her to hang out with me in my room since it’s empty. We talk. She tells me that she’s looking for a job. I share my experiences working at Chick-fil-a. Good memories of good sandwiches ensue. She cuts up my problems for speed dating.

10:40am | Period 4 begins. Today we’re writing the conic form of the equation of a parabola. On Friday they used Desmos to explore how a parabola is the set of points equidistant from a line and a fixed point. I overview the two common forms, first vertex and then manipulating that to get standard form. I whip out the small whiteboards and pair up the kids. I post graphs of parabolas and have them practice writing the vertex and standard forms for it. They hold up their boards and we discuss. I’m always amazed at the high levels of assessment that whitebaording permits. The lesson is a keeper.

11:30am | I head across the hall for period 5, also algebra 2. This group is one day ahead of period 4. The group speed dating is going to sum up our quadratics unit. I quickly realize that the problems I included in the activity will need three days to be completely reviewed by every group. That said, I would consider the period is a success.

12:15pm | Lunch. There isn’t much planning I need to do for the remaining two periods that I teach so I manage to actually enjoy my feast, if a bare-bones salad and two oranges qualify as such.

One side note. On Monday, Wednesday, and Friday there is an “Assimilation” elective that takes place in my room when I eat lunch. It basically th college advisor sharing all kinds of useful knowledge with the kids. I always stay in the room during lunch for his class. I find him to be incredibly cultured and knowledgeable on so many things. Today’s topic was real estate. It didn’t disappoint.

1:45pm | My period 7 class ends. More VNPS and VRG action. They eat it up. Pure and utter engagement for 30 minutes, easy.

My period 8 walk in. I love these kids. They’re my only ninth grade class and they keep me in touch with the younger side of high school. We’re shifting parabolas today. The lesson is rushed — we’ll need to take a closer look tomorrow.

2:35pm | On Monday, my school holds district-mandated PD for us. I head down to room 229, where the PD will take place. The focus today is curriculum maps. It’s the first of a series of four workshops on the matter. The idea is that as we close the school year, we adapt and improve the maps we currently have for next year.

The session was better than expected. I really like the teacher who ran it…and his approach was untraditional. Instead a dry, boring approach to curriculum maps, he encouraged us to look to and learn from our colleagues to help us envision the ideal student. We talked. He emphasized hard skills and soft skills as something we should gear towards. This, he argued, would help us build a curriculum map for the whole student that plays off what our colleagues believe in.

4:00pm | The faculty meeting finishes and I leave school in a haste to make it to Math for America for a interest group meeting. I’m helping plan the first-ever MfA summer conference and tonight the planning committee is getting together.

4:21pm | I get on the 6 train, doubtful that I’ll make the 5:30pm start time for the meeting.

5:05pm | Shockingly, I arrive at MfA. I grab some pizza and catch up with a few of the committee members. Our goals tonight include  improving the conference website, putting together a loose schedule of the sessions with the proposals we’ve received, and create a Google form for registration which starts tomorrow. I agree to help tackle the website with Carl Oliver.

6:35pm | Carl and I give the site a face lift. A part of the website is a blog. I write a brief post on the origins of the conference. Sometimes I still can’t believe this conference is actually happening…and that I’m helping to make it happen!

7:35pm | We wrap up a very productive meeting. Everyone heads out.

8:40pm | I arrive home after a long, yet productive, day. I wide down for a while before heading to bed at 9:30pm.

 

1. Teachers make a lot of decisions throughout the day. Sometimes we make so many it feels overwhelming. When you think about today, what is a decision/teacher move you made that you are proud of? What is one you are worried wasn’t ideal?

Though I’ve really enjoyed teaching them, I know I’ve put my ninth grade class on the back burner of my teaching responsibilities this year. I’ve basically been teaching from a textbook with them. I’ve been improvising where I can with Desmos and other tools and strategies, but the engagement and rigor for that class is not even close where it should be. I’ve dedicated almost all of my energy to my algebra 2 classes. I sort of regret it. One side note: they LOVE VNPS and VRG. It’s crazy.

2. Every person’s life is full of highs and lows. Share with us some of what that is like for a teacher. What are you looking forward to? What has been a challenge for you lately?

I’ve had a couple visitors in my classroom this month, all of which from the Superintendent’s office. One was the superintendent himself, and another was in relation to the Big Apple Award that I was nominated for.

The observed lesson wasn’t ideal by any stretch. But maybe it’s fitting because that happens so often anyhow. (Thank you to 16th school trip of the season and random students from Denmark.) Nonetheless, the entire experience has been uplifting. Thank you to Mike for the humbling nomination that led to all this. Throughout everything, I couldn’t help but think of all the educators and leaders that have inspired me, like my former principal.

Regardless of the outcome, I hope that the passion, dedication, and thoughtfulness that I have for my students and school community was felt. I hope that the immense respect that I have for learning and the teaching profession also this came through.

3. We are reminded constantly of how relational teaching is. As teachers we work to build relationships with our coworkers and students. Describe a relational moment you had with someone recently.

All of I can think of in response to this prompt is my first period class. Our relationship this year has been a roller coaster, but for the last couple of weeks I think we’ve really connected. I realized this month that for a good part of the year I didn’t enjoy teaching them. I wouldn’t say I was merely going through the process, but I definitely wasn’t all in. I would rarely smile. I wouldn’t listen to them.

I was too frustrated with what I thought was their lack of motivation and ability. But that was just me teaching above them. I was focusing on curriculum and standards. I was ignoring who they were. I wasn’t teaching to their strengths.

Things still aren’t perfect now. But they’re far better than they were earlier this year.

4. Teachers are always working on improving, and often have specific goals for things to work on throughout a year. What is a goal you have for the year?

Although I didn’t explicitly state them in my goals for the year, I’ve discovered a place for VNPS and VRG in classroom this past month. My recent experiences have changed my classroom forever. It’s ironic that no matter how hard you try, sometimes you simply can’t plan for the best things that happen to you. They just do. Mostly out of necessity. It was sort of like that with VNPS and VRG.

5. What else happened this month that you would like to share?

My National Board submission is kicking my butt. Thanks Michael for all of your help with complex numbers.

 

bp

Day in the Life: March 24, 2017 (Post #9)

I’ve decided to chronicle this school year through my blog. It’s part of Tina Cardone’s Day in the Life book project. This is the ninth post in the series.

5:15am | I wake up, make some coffee, and put my lunch together.

I sip coffee and read for half an hour. I started The Classroom Chef yesterday and it left me wanting more…so I hold off on finishing How to Bake Pi until this weekend. Reading two books that relate mathematics and mathematics education to cooking and eating  just isn’t right. I’m hungry all the time now!

6:00am | I draft this post, turn on the radio. On any given day, I listen to either sports talk or NPR. Today it’s ESPN radio. I’m a lifelong sports fan, yeah, but I also really enjoy the fact that sports talk radio removes me from all the dark holes of the world. They’re not going to talk politics or hollywood gossip. Other than books and writing, sports and sports talk is my quick getaway.

I eat breakfast and shower. I grab the bike and I’m on my way to school by 7am.

7:15am | I walk in the building, move my timecard over and see a colleague from the math department. He’s making copies in the main office. I think: how crazy is it that my school only has one commercial grade copy machine? That’s not a new thought by any means, but it always crosses my mind when I see someone making copies. Anyhow, we greet one another briefly and I head up to my classroom.

I thought I left my school keys in my classroom yesterday, so I ask another teacher to unlock my classroom door. Inside, I realize the keys were in my bag all along. Nice.

Today is parent-teacher conferences. In NYC public schools, parent-teacher conferences happen on back-to-back days in the fall and spring. The first of each back-to-back is always on a Thursday evening, which runs from 5pm-8pm. That was yesterday. Today is the second day (Friday), which runs in the afternoon from 11:35pm to 2:35pm. School is let out early; I will only see my first period students today.

I finish up some paperwork left from yesterday and plan a quick review RISK game for finding a trigonometric ratio, given one. On top of parent-teacher conferences, my school is having our quarterly awards event. It’s pretty cool and all student run. The show starts in the middle of period 2. The seniors are organizing and hosting today’s show. Guess who primarily makes up my first period class? Yep, seniors. My my first period is going to be small.

9:05am | First period was quiet and the game sort of fell apart, but that’s ok. Sometimes its just great to have the opportunity to talk to students, get inside their head. That’s kind of what happened. Anyhow, I’m back at my desk and finalize more paperwork (see a trend?) before I have a few minutes to begin thinking about my next unit that’ll start on Monday, quadratic functions. At 9:15, everyone’s called down to the auditorium.

10:30am | The awards finish. I’ve only experienced a few of these things, but the show is pretty good this go around. The seniors do their thing. One interesting tidbit: the awards themselves focus on strictly academics (e.g. most improved in science), but the seniors elected to also hand out awards recognizing non-academic attributes. I really, really liked this. Too often my school stresses academics to the point that every other aspect of a student’s life gets bypassed. They highlighted this with class and the whole school appreciated it.

11:35amParent-teacher conferences start. It’s pretty straightforward, but with some interesting takeaways this year. More on this below.

2:00pmThe traffic of parents slows to a trickle. The Friday of parent-teacher conferences is usually pretty mellow…and today is no different.

Between parents I find some time to continue pinning down my quadratic functions unit. As things wind down, my assistant principal and I have a great, impromptu conversation in my classroom about a variety of things. We speak of our pasts, our journeys through teaching, and next week. Our relationship this year has really taken off and I’m so proud of the bond I’ve created with her. Her support has been just what I’ve needed to offset my new-school struggles.

2:35pmThe conferences officially end. As everyone rushes off for their weekend, I stay behind to polish off my planning and to make copies. I’ve never been the type to hurry out on a Friday. Actually, I love when everyone else does because its quiet and gives me time to be in my thoughts, uninterrupted.

While my copies are running, I manage to finish grading some exams. I also manage to post the next person in my “Mathematicians Beyond White Dudes” project in all three classrooms in which I teach.

5:00pmI leave school. I make it home in fifteen minutes, bypassing all the drivers stuck in Friday evening traffic. (Mindfully not owning an automobile is one decision I take great pride in.) During the ride home I consume myself with what I hope to accomplish during my Big Apple Award visit next Thursday.

9:00pmI hit the sheets. Goodnight.

1. Teachers make a lot of decisions throughout the day. Sometimes we make so many it feels overwhelming. When you think about today, what is a decision/teacher move you made that you are proud of? What is one you are worried wasn’t ideal?

On Wednesday and Thursday of this week our school restructured both days to mimic the Regents exams. Students were scheduled for two- or three-hour blocks for Mock Regents exams in each of the four major content areas. I decided early on that:

  1. I wasn’t going to spend class time reviewing for the exam.
  2. I wasn’t going count the exams towards students’ overall class grades.

Based on who I spoke to, this was not what others at my school were planning on doing. This did make me feel a certain way, but I wasn’t going to budge on my philosophy. Why force an low-stakes exam to be high-stakes? Why review? By cramming the day or two before the exam, wouldn’t that give me an even less representation of what my kids actually know? Why not use the exam strictly for feedback? Why does everything need a grade? Isn’t the goal to learn and grow from the experience? If I tag their performance with a grade aren’t I just reinforcing a system that is failing them already?

2. Every person’s life is full of highs and lows. Share with us some of what that is like for a teacher. What are you looking forward to? What has been a challenge for you lately?

There was a crucial moment during yesterday’s conferences that I know will stay with me for a while, for both good and bad reasons.

I was speaking with a student from my first period class and her mother. She’s quiet, respectful, but struggles to grasp some of what we do in class. I’d like to think we have a decent student-teacher relationship, but the dynamics of her class have prevented me from connecting with her on any significant level.

With this in the back of my mind, I open by asking her how things are going for her in class. I never really get to speak with her, so I’m really interested in her answer. She says in a very simple, straightforward way, “It’s alright. Alright. I’ve never been good in math. I just never have. That’s ok.” 

I’m shocked. Maybe shocked is the wrong word. More like disappointed. I told her that I didn’t believe whatsoever that she wasn’t good at math. I told her that she was very insightful and her mathematical perspective was worthwhile. I told her that I valued her. I also let her and her mom know that I haven’t done the best job at putting her in a place to feel successful and valuable in our class. To her, I’m sure this all probably sounded like blah, blah, blah. Actions speak much louder than words.

I know that I’ve heard this from a student in the past. But this time was different. A lot of things feel different these days.

I was humbled. I realized in that moment that I have so much more work to do when it comes to building meaningful mathematical mindsets in my class, something that I’ve been increasingly aware of this year.

3. We are reminded constantly of how relational teaching is. As teachers we work to build relationships with our coworkers and students. Describe a relational moment you had with someone recently.

Something really cool happened today. During the conferences, a brother of one of my students noticed my Mathematicians Beyond White Dudes posters and pulled out his phone to snap a photo of them. We talked a little bit about the motivation behind the project. He sincerely appreciated the fact that I was showcasing underrepresented mathematicians. It was a great moment.

4. Teachers are always working on improving, and often have specific goals for things to work on throughout a year. What is a goal you have for the year?

I’m slowly realizing that my goals for the 2016-17 year are coming to fruition, just not how I originally expected. Not all is lost.

5. What else happened this month that you would like to share?

Since today was parent-teacher conferences, I’ll close by saying how different I feel about the interactions that take place on days like today. I have a completely different perspective on these conferences now compared to earlier in my career…even up to just a couple of years ago.

A lot of this is related to how my teaching philosophy has evolved. The fulfillment I get from PT conferences goes beyond meeting and speaking to the parents of students who are knuckleheads or who aren’t living up to their true potential in my class. My fulfillment comes from somewhere far more intense, far more wholesome. It’s comes from a place only a parent can truly understand.

 

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Day in the Life: February 24, 2017 (Post #8)

I’ve decided to chronicle this school year through my blog. It’s part of Tina Cardone’s Day in the Life book project. This is the eighth post in the series.

5:45am | Rise and shine. This is fourth consecutive Day in the Life post that is not a teaching day for me. The New York City Public Schools are on midwinter break this week. Traditionally public schools in US have two weeks for winter recess for Christmas and New Years. Instead, we only get one week and get the other week off in February. I love it.

I make coffee and read. Right now I’m in the middle of How to Bake Pi by Eugenia Cheng and Strength in Numbers by Illana Siedal Horn. I read some of the latter and sip my coffee for about half an hour and then hang out with the family for a while and eat. I also begin drafting this post.

8:30am | Today I have my Renewal Master Teacher interview with Math for America. It’s scheduled for 10:40am, so I get ready to leave. Am I nervous? A little. But my experiences with MfA have been so uplifting these last four years that I would say I’m far more excited than nervous. I have a lot to share. More on this later.

I shower and I’m out the door just before 9.

9:15am | I’m on the 5 train. I tap out more of this post on my phone and read more of Strength in Numbers.

After a few minor delays, I arrive at Union Square at 10:10. I have enough time to grab a muffin and apple from the farmer’s market and do some people watching for the next 20 minutes. I walk down the MfA offices for my interview. I don’t wait long. After a minute or two I’m called in.

11:10am | I walk out of the interview feeling pretty good about how things went, but you never know. It was really laid back. More like a conversation than an interview.

I’m meeting with another MfA teacher to map out an upcoming workshop we’re running next week. We meet up at the City Bakery and talk. We wrap up around 12:15pm and I head out to grab some lunch in the area. I get a salad from Chop’t and lounge at Union Square. The weather is stunning, 70 degrees with plenty sun. A total gem. After soaking up some rays and watching some skateboarders attempt trick after trick, I head to the train.

1:00pm | I’m on the 4 train headed uptown, back home. I brought both books with me, and I’m feeling rather mathy on the ride home, so I crack open Eugenia Cheng.

1:45pm | I’m back in the ‘hood. I run a couple of errands. I want to simply be outside for the remainder of the afternoon because it’s so nice, but I have to get some work done today so I meander back home.

3:15pm | This school year I’ve been putting off work on my National Board Certification Component 2 submission. Now that the MfA renewal is officially complete and out of my mind, I want to channel a lot of energy towards prepping and completing the submission. It’s a beast and it’s going to need my full attention to tackle.

I decided early in the year that I wanted to showcase my deserted island activity for it, but yesterday realized that I wanted to use some of my intro and graphing logarithms material for the submission. Well, after a solid hour and forty-five minutes of deep thinking, I’m still unsure about the route I want to take. Mind you I haven’t even begin writing up the 10+ pages that the submission requires…I’m still deciding on the activities. It’s due May 17. Pray for me.

Despite sitting in front of my computer for all that time more confused than ever, I do manage to make it back outside for more fun in the sun. Family time. The best time.

9:00pm | I’m in the middle of watching the Raptors and Celtics on ESPN and can’t seem to keep my eyes open. Off to bed I go.

1. Teachers make a lot of decisions throughout the day. Sometimes we make so many it feels overwhelming. When you think about today, what is a decision/teacher move you made that you are proud of? What is one you are worried wasn’t ideal?

I am concerned about my NBCT submission. I would have really liked to have my two required activities pinned down by this point in the year, but I don’t. With that said, I know how I think. I’m a slow, grind-it-out sort of person. Things don’t usually hit me in a flash. So although I didn’t walk away with the answer today, I know that my time investment brought me closer to finding it.

2. Every person’s life is full of highs and lows. Share with us some of what that is like for a teacher. What are you looking forward to? What has been a challenge for you lately?

To close the first semester at the beginning of this month, I had my students complete a “report card” for my teaching. I asked many questions and there were different trends in every class, but one commonality was their dissatisfaction with how I pace the course. I got the same feedback last year.

I say that to say that I came to the realization that I must slow down. Moreover, I realized that, as is, I’m not going to finish the algebra 2 curriculum. It’s not realistic. This is a result of me adapting to the new set of standards and confusing myself along the way. Needless to say, Its been a rough go.

Anyhow, my students need exposure to the entire curriculum for the Regents exam. My solution to this dilemma is to organize video lessons for my students to watch that will introduce the material that we won’t cover in class. The students will watch the videos at the own leisure outside of our regular lessons. This is very disappointing – especially because the videos will cover of the entire statistics and probability units.

3. We are reminded constantly of how relational teaching is. As teachers we work to build relationships with our coworkers and students. Describe a relational moment you had with someone recently.

This relational moment doesn’t pertain to any specific person. Rather, it’s about an organization – Math for America.

It’s remarkable just how different of a teacher I am after four years being given a MfA fellowship. My relationship with MfA has grown from one of deep admiration and respect to one of deep trust and responsibility. Summarizing four years worth of immense growth into a thirty-minute interview today wasn’t possible, but I hope the interviewers got a sense of my deep-seeded gratitude for how MfA’s impact on my career. I’ve been mindful of giving back to the community these last four years – beyond merely facilitating workshops and completing surveys. It’s the absolute least I can do for all that they’ve given me and my career.

There was interesting moment during the interview. I mentioned that I felt somewhat guilty applying for renewal because even if I wasn’t picked up for renewal, I would still take advantage of the MfA community by means of the Emeritus program – which doesn’t include the stipend. I’m certain that there are teachers new to MfA that would only be interested in applying and joining the community because of the stipend. In this way, I expressed that I openly accept not being offered a Renewal Mater Teacher fellowship. In fact, I questioned whether I should even apply for the fellowship in order to make space for someone new who otherwise might not get the opportunity.

4. Teachers are always working on improving, and often have specific goals for things to work on throughout a year. What is a goal you have for the year?

In my last DITL post I was disappointed at how little I was integrating instructional routines into my teaching, one of my big goals for this year. I’m proud of the fact that since then I have pushed myself to use at least one instructional routine in all of my classes…with more on the way. Things have slowed down at school and as a result I’ve been able to process the curriculum in a more structural way. I must keep at it.

5. What else happened this month that you would like to share?

In order to help bring a much-needed culture of mathematics to my school, I’m pumped about starting an after school math club. I surveyed my students and there is definite interest. I even attended a workshop to help me get it started. My hope is to have some initial meetings before the close of the school year. Worst case, I get things off the ground next year. Either way, I took concrete steps this month to make it a reality.

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